For many men, the act of growing older can be a troubling time in their lives. They experience lethargy, lowered libido, less mental acuity. It’s part of the process of aging. Pharmaceutical companies, however, have taken issue with mother nature’s course and decided that they testosterone therapies are the cure for what aging causes. The condition is commonly referred to as Low-T (Low Testosterone) and the treatments may be causing more damage than is being disclosed.

“These testosterone therapies are not a cure-all for the effects of aging,” commented Robert Blanchard, a partner with the Levin, Papantonio law firm who practices in the areas of bad drug and defective device litigation. “Manufacturers should not minimize, downplay or outright hide the dangers associated with their products from consumers.”

The Food and Drug Administration announced that it would be investigating the risk of stroke, heart attack, and death associated with Low-T treatments.

“We have been monitoring this risk and decided to reassess this safety issue based on the recent publication of two separate studies that each suggested an increased risk of cardiovascular events among groups of men prescribed testosterone therapy. We are providing this alert while we continue to evaluate the information from these studies and other available data…”

Across the country men who have been injured as a result of taking testosterone therapies to treat Low-T have been filing lawsuits against the manufacturers. These lawsuits often highlight how the companies responsible for producing the treatment failed to properly warn the patients of the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death associated with Low-T. The number of Low-T lawsuits filed is expected to continue to rise.

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K.J. McElrath is a former history and social studies teacher who has long maintained a keen interest in legal and social issues. In addition to writing for The Ring of Fire, he is the author of two published novels: Tamanous Cooley, a darkly comic environmental twist on Dante's Inferno, and The Missionary's Wife, a story of the conflict between human nature and fundamentalist religious dogma. When not engaged in journalistic or literary pursuits, K.J. works as an entertainer and film composer.